Current hurricane paths follow the same route as the African Slave Trade. Hmmm

This post was researched and written by a great Sis who writes “Dat Nola Chic”

DAT NOLA CHIC

SEARCH

NON-FICTIONUNCATEGORIZED

Hurricanes and African Slave Trade : What’s real?

This recent Hurricane season has captured the world’s attention and have us all questioning what the experts really know, if anything at all and the talk Hurricane’s and Slavery. Which leads me to ask why would one believe such as story as Africans being angry hundreds of years later and showing that anger by releasing the spirit of a horrible hurricane to destroy and take lives over all these years.

The only correlation I have found was that both had the same start. It has been proven that Hurricanes that most are formed around the coast Africa and follow the same path as slave ships .

There are African-American folktales about Hurricanes being the energy source of our ancestors; stolen Africans, beaten and lost at sea. Can Hurricanes be a mythical avenger that comes to right the wrongs of our ancestors? Souls of the sea, who unleash their wrath annually unto their oppressors?

wp-image-702036922.

Is there a connection between the Atlantic Slave Trade Routes and the path taken by hurricanes? If so, what about those who did not die while en route, but made it to live out their lives as slaves? What vengeance do they get?wp-image-252553052

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADREPORT THIS AD

wp-image-1632222100.

Some would like to see it that way, but a Hurricane like all natural disasters do not discriminate. I would hope that if a spell of sort was cast into the ocean in honor of my ancestors that its effects would not affect black people. It would be irresponsible and cruel of them to call upon this mythical storm to be released in the same direction of  their loved ones.

Yes, they traveled the same path as Hurricanes, but wouldn’t that mean they were affected by Hurricanes as well? Maybe, they prayed that the oceans would swallow the entire ship so that they may have rest and peace, not this hoodoo stuff.

wp-image-1493612073

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

I do not like all the hype about an ocean full of angry African souls who have not found peace and are out for revenge. It’s hard being alive seeing all the suffering just from this past Hurricane season, but to have people speak highly about my ancestors in this manner is heartbreaking.

wp-image-1530575276

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

Hurricanes bring death, destruction and suffering to all people no matter race, economical or social status. Katrina proved that the majority of people affected where poor black people. Yet, there’s the talk of an angry oppressed African spirit of the sea?

wp-image-432944215

Katrina also had religious folks saying, New Orleans was struck in such a manner, because of all the sin in our city.. I actually stopped attending church after a pastor used the fate of my city for his sermon. I wonder what they will say now? Texas is a cowboy redneck state, a big one at that and Florida follows suit.

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADREPORT THIS AD

No human wants to see others suffering, especially when it can happen to them. In saying that my ancestors would want to inflict the suffering that people are enduring after these Hurricanes is a dishonor to their spirits. To say that, they would be calling them inhuman, uncaring, unloving and the list goes on. Why would we agree in saying they would want someone to suffer, because they did? I have felt my share of heartache, feeling wronged and victimized, but I would never want another person to go through what I went through not even my oppressor.

wp-image-323229140

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

I do not think any of us can just simply go through our day without even a thought of what our fellow citizens are going through. None of us are immune to disaster, there’s no sum of money that will save Mr.Billionaire’s life or his property in comparison to ours. This is not Black/White Lives Matters, this is All Lives Matters and we must at least show compassion to those going through right now.

I can’t imagine what my ancestors went through while enduring whatever storm was in their path, but today I can close my eyes and picture the elderly people in Texas. They do not share my culture or skin color, but they represented exactly what it means to endure suffering. They were living in a disaster, in fear, uncertain if they were sitting in their actual  water grave. They were calm, possibly praying that their families were safe and sound while they sat waist deep in flood waters. I’m pretty sure had they lost their lives their souls would not have been tagged with the next disaster or the tangled up in headlines, because they wanted to avenge their suffering by suing the nursing home. I believe their reactions and emotions were inline with what my ancestors felt at the time as well.

wp-image-346277588

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

It’s not fair to pin a natural disaster on someone’s soul, no one has that type of vengeance on their heart. Suffering is terrible. I know we all wish we could control the amount and type of it that we had to endure, but we can’t. I wish that instead of blaming a group of people for what was done that we could enjoy the benefits of all that was accomplished from it. We can learn from our ancestors past and do them a favor of not repeating it and honor them by doing better.

wp-image-1841712458

Is it that important making sure the slave masters of yesteryear are held responsible or should we keep the hype up about our ancestors needing vindication via Hurricanes? Or do we learn more about emergency preparedness, push the government  to have a true emergency plan & monies for the poor, sick, elderly and animals to get out in time.  It’s proven that most people stay at home, because they do not have the resources to leave. Just like with the hospitals and nursing homes, there’s no true evacuation plan and now has proven that there should be.

A Hurricane or any other natural disaster is not a spirit, it’s Mother Nature and we have very limited knowledge as to why it happens, but from our ancestor, some may call it science, but whatever it is, we have no power or control over it. We have some knowledge on how to live and hopefully survive when it happens, but in the meantime we must assist those who are suffering from the effects of the disasters.

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

A disaster comes in many forms, some of us may go through life without a severe devastation, but regardless they can be soul changing, heartbreaking and will leave scars that can not be seen with eye.

wp-image-1085319675

A hurricane is formed and it travels, it does not make any sense that people are unable to receive assistance with evacuating.

My heart is so heavy for my country, for the world actually, we have to find a way to enjoy our lives and those in it. It didn’t take a nuclear bomb to destroy popular tourist destination, it wasn’t Avenge of Slaves, it was a Hurricane. I’m not sure if the Leaders of the world see that, but I do.DAT NOLA CHIC#HURRICANE ##KATRINA #HURRICANEKATRINA#LIFE #NATURALDISASTERS #LOSS #HOUSTON #KATRINA ##MIDDLEPASSAGE #SLAVES#NEWORLEANS ##SLAVERY#SLAVETRADE #TRANSATLANTIC #SLAVE

SEARCH

NON-FICTIONUNCATEGORIZED

Hurricanes and African Slave Trade : What’s real?

This recent Hurricane season has captured the world’s attention and have us all questioning what the experts really know, if anything at all and the talk Hurricane’s and Slavery. Which leads me to ask why would one believe such as story as Africans being angry hundreds of years later and showing that anger by releasing the spirit of a horrible hurricane to destroy and take lives over all these years.

The only correlation I have found was that both had the same start. It has been proven that Hurricanes that most are formed around the coast Africa and follow the same path as slave ships .

There are African-American folktales about Hurricanes being the energy source of our ancestors; stolen Africans, beaten and lost at sea. Can Hurricanes be a mythical avenger that comes to right the wrongs of our ancestors? Souls of the sea, who unleash their wrath annually unto their oppressors?

wp-image-702036922.

Is there a connection between the Atlantic Slave Trade Routes and the path taken by hurricanes? If so, what about those who did not die while en route, but made it to live out their lives as slaves? What vengeance do they get?wp-image-252553052

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADREPORT THIS AD

wp-image-1632222100.

Some would like to see it that way, but a Hurricane like all natural disasters do not discriminate. I would hope that if a spell of sort was cast into the ocean in honor of my ancestors that its effects would not affect black people. It would be irresponsible and cruel of them to call upon this mythical storm to be released in the same direction of  their loved ones.

Yes, they traveled the same path as Hurricanes, but wouldn’t that mean they were affected by Hurricanes as well? Maybe, they prayed that the oceans would swallow the entire ship so that they may have rest and peace, not this hoodoo stuff.

wp-image-1493612073

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

I do not like all the hype about an ocean full of angry African souls who have not found peace and are out for revenge. It’s hard being alive seeing all the suffering just from this past Hurricane season, but to have people speak highly about my ancestors in this manner is heartbreaking.

wp-image-1530575276

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

Hurricanes bring death, destruction and suffering to all people no matter race, economical or social status. Katrina proved that the majority of people affected where poor black people. Yet, there’s the talk of an angry oppressed African spirit of the sea?

wp-image-432944215

Katrina also had religious folks saying, New Orleans was struck in such a manner, because of all the sin in our city.. I actually stopped attending church after a pastor used the fate of my city for his sermon. I wonder what they will say now? Texas is a cowboy redneck state, a big one at that and Florida follows suit.

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADREPORT THIS AD

No human wants to see others suffering, especially when it can happen to them. In saying that my ancestors would want to inflict the suffering that people are enduring after these Hurricanes is a dishonor to their spirits. To say that, they would be calling them inhuman, uncaring, unloving and the list goes on. Why would we agree in saying they would want someone to suffer, because they did? I have felt my share of heartache, feeling wronged and victimized, but I would never want another person to go through what I went through not even my oppressor.

wp-image-323229140

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

I do not think any of us can just simply go through our day without even a thought of what our fellow citizens are going through. None of us are immune to disaster, there’s no sum of money that will save Mr.Billionaire’s life or his property in comparison to ours. This is not Black/White Lives Matters, this is All Lives Matters and we must at least show compassion to those going through right now.

I can’t imagine what my ancestors went through while enduring whatever storm was in their path, but today I can close my eyes and picture the elderly people in Texas. They do not share my culture or skin color, but they represented exactly what it means to endure suffering. They were living in a disaster, in fear, uncertain if they were sitting in their actual  water grave. They were calm, possibly praying that their families were safe and sound while they sat waist deep in flood waters. I’m pretty sure had they lost their lives their souls would not have been tagged with the next disaster or the tangled up in headlines, because they wanted to avenge their suffering by suing the nursing home. I believe their reactions and emotions were inline with what my ancestors felt at the time as well.

wp-image-346277588

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

It’s not fair to pin a natural disaster on someone’s soul, no one has that type of vengeance on their heart. Suffering is terrible. I know we all wish we could control the amount and type of it that we had to endure, but we can’t. I wish that instead of blaming a group of people for what was done that we could enjoy the benefits of all that was accomplished from it. We can learn from our ancestors past and do them a favor of not repeating it and honor them by doing better.

wp-image-1841712458

Is it that important making sure the slave masters of yesteryear are held responsible or should we keep the hype up about our ancestors needing vindication via Hurricanes? Or do we learn more about emergency preparedness, push the government  to have a true emergency plan & monies for the poor, sick, elderly and animals to get out in time.  It’s proven that most people stay at home, because they do not have the resources to leave. Just like with the hospitals and nursing homes, there’s no true evacuation plan and now has proven that there should be.

A Hurricane or any other natural disaster is not a spirit, it’s Mother Nature and we have very limited knowledge as to why it happens, but from our ancestor, some may call it science, but whatever it is, we have no power or control over it. We have some knowledge on how to live and hopefully survive when it happens, but in the meantime we must assist those who are suffering from the effects of the disasters.

https://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS ADhttps://c0.pubmine.com/sf/0.0.3/html/safeframe.htmlREPORT THIS AD

A disaster comes in many forms, some of us may go through life without a severe devastation, but regardless they can be soul changing, heartbreaking and will leave scars that can not be seen with eye.

wp-image-1085319675

A hurricane is formed and it travels, it does not make any sense that people are unable to receive assistance with evacuating.

My heart is so heavy for my country, for the world actually, we have to find a way to enjoy our lives and those in it. It didn’t take a nuclear bomb to destroy popular tourist destination, it wasn’t Avenge of Slaves, it was a Hurricane. I’m not sure if the Leaders of the world see that, but I do.DAT NOLA CHIC#HURRICANE ##KATRINA #HURRICANEKATRINA#LIFE #NATURALDISASTERS #LOSS #HOUSTON #KATRINA ##MIDDLEPASSAGE #SLAVES#NEWORLEANS ##SLAVERY#SLAVETRADE #TRANSATLANTIC #SLAVE

Slave songs: Drumming up courage and hope

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is lucy-mckim-garrison-music-sheet.jpg
“Roll, Jordan, Roll” was was coded for escaped slaves

The coded song for escaped slaves, “Roll, Jordan, Roll,” was one of many notable works captured by a young musicologist and published in 1867.

Lucy McKim was 19-years-old when she traveled with her abolitionist father in 1862 to the Sea Islands of Georgia for a three-week visit to check on the conditions of recently freed slaves. The piano teacher was naturally drawn to the songs being sung in different quarters by the newly freed people.

She began to chronicle their songs and in 1867, the then-wife of Wendell Phillip Garrison, published her work with two collaborators. The compelling story of her life and work is found in many journals and books.

Lucy McKim Garrison

Truly “Songs of Sorrow” as viewed by Lucy McKim Garrison, yet freedom songs for slaves

Courtesy of “Documenting the American South,” UNC-Chapel Hill LibraryLucy McKim Garrison was a musicologist born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on October 30, 1842.

She was born to James Miller and Sarah Allibone McKim. Her parents and other family members were known throughout the abolitionist community and had connections to Quakerism. Garrison received her education in Philadelphia but later moved to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, to attend the Eaglewood School. At the time that Garrison attended Eaglewood, the Grimke sisters were managing it and the school was attended by many abolitionists. She taught piano in Philadelphia and at the Eaglewood School.

During the Civil War in 1862, Garrison traveled with her father, who worked for the Port Royal Relief Committee, to South Carolina to investigate conditions of recently freed slaves. For three weeks, they stayed in the Sea Islands where she listened to the songs of the freedmen and attempted to put the songs into musical notation. The public did not receive her work well upon some of her first publications, so the project was put on hold.

Lucy and Wendell Phillips Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison’s third son, became engaged in 1864 and married on December 6, 1865. In 1867, Garrison gave birth to their first son, Lloyd, and also created Slave Songs of the United States in collaboration with William Francis Allen and Charles Pickard Ware. The publication is considered one of the best sources of slave songs. The couple’s son Philip was born in 1869, followed by their daughter, Katherine, in 1873. Garrison died on May 11, 1877, following a paralytic stroke at age 34. She is buried in Rosedale Cemetery in Orange, New Jersey.

Our Partners

Here’s another great work about this great lady.

https://udayton.edu/magazine/2020/02/power-of-a-song-in-a-strange-land.php

Google celebrates Women’s History Month with tributes to our ancestral trailblazers

Google has a great tribute to women during March, International Women’s History Month

Check out the links and learn!

Madame CJ Walker was instrumental in my life. My great Aunt Daisy Shanks was recruited by this great hair care entrepreneur and millionaire to join her in New York state. For both of these ladies in the 1916 – 1919 period, the rest is history

https://g.co/arts/tnjCnz5PjQSxRPY7

See and hear the rest of Google’s outstanding tribute:

https://my.impactree.com/t/WHl41MQ61b9WEWag8I7c

https://g.co/arts/Ttsg5virP6nUyrXSA


As a former Olympics organizer (the Atlanta Games 1993-1996), I have always appreciated the female athletes who achieve all odds.

https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/game-changers/gRJ3eKVt

#2 Peek: Out of Sight e-book for beginning Black genealogists

PART I: Out of Our Gloomy Past

Slavery’s Impact Upon Black Genealogical Research

  Slavery’s far-reaching effect upon the lives of African Americans is the single-most reason why it is challenging to easily research involving our Black ancestors. Records of names, places of origin, accurate ages and other important data were not kept for slaves or if kept, are likely long ago destroyed or lost. In rare instances, some of the basic passenger information was retained by the Atlantic Ocean ship’s captain or slave holders. In the records born from slave holders, it is likely that the surnames are the same as the persons who took possession of our ancestors.

The estimates vary on when the first slaves were shipped across the Atlantic to the North and South American soil. Some reports suggest that the first slaves arrived on U.S. shores somewhere between 1525 and 1619. It is well documented that in 1619, slaves were unloaded from ships at Port Comfort, VA., near Jamestown. Between 1619 and 1866, approximately 13 million Africans were packed into ships headed for the “New World.” Of that, an estimated two million slaves perished by disease, suicides and other means, making their graves the Atlantic Ocean. That left an approximate 10.7 million Africans who survived the brutal slave ships’ conditions across the Atlantic Ocean. It is estimated 388,000 black ancestors arrived along North American shores through 1866, according to the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database (edited by Profs. David Eltis and David Richardson). The remainder of the precious “cargo” was delivered to South American and Caribbean countries.

Sometimes in the pursuit of African American ancestors, the inquiries or checklists do not take into consideration that not U.S. residents arrived on these shores with passenger lists to identify them. One case in point is found in a test that I took to a complete a genealogy course. I missed the correct answer on one question because I responded based on my African American family history.   The question on the examination was: “Which immigration records are the best sources for determining if someone’s ancestor arrived in the United States from an international country. The instructor’s answer was “Passenger lists.”  The answer choices did not include one for my ancestors. This is an example of the importance of remaining flexible and open to the workarounds and delays in retrieving records related to your family’s ancestors.

 When searching for ancestors not all potential information is included in general inquiries. Many records unique to Black, Native Americans, Afro-Caribbean ancestors are not integrated into traditional family ancestry searches. For instance, “Slave Schedules” is not included in an ancestry site query for a relative. Therefore, it is important to review all categories of detailed listings such as the Sumter County, Alabama, U.S., Circuit Court Files, 1840-1950 and Americus times-recorder NEW.  It is advisable to rely on more than one on-line genealogy site to expand the ancestral search and build family trees.

Pre- and Post-Civil War Searches

The important benchmarks that are integral to effectively and efficiently researching African American ancestry are divided in two major categories:

  1. Slave families before the Civil War.
  2. Black and African American families beginning with the 1870 Census.

Prior to the Civil War, information and data about African American ancestors is sparse and vastly different than that of others. Slaves’ surnames were often the same as their owners and not of their African-given names.  In addition, the U.S. Census Bureau developed separate listings known as “Slave Schedules” in 1850 and 1860. While not providing the names of slaves, the Slave Schedules provide the owners’ names. In many cases, the identifiers for slaves included the ages, sex and varying notations such as “deaf …dumb.”

However, after the war and beginning with the 1870 Census, the official recordkeeping involving Blacks was similar to that of U.S. Whites and immigrants. While some former slaves maintained the slave owners’ surnames given to them, others changed their last names. That is why the family Bible is so important as it was a historical recorder of the important events in the lives of freed slaves. The family Bible also served as an official legal document in the courthouse where African Americans sought official birth records. Usually, the births of our family members occurred with the help of midwives. The midwives were also principally responsible for reporting births to the respective county court houses.

Making the most of “Brick walls”

Between 1920 and 1930, my Great-Grandmother Carrie changed the spelling of our surname to “Wead” and my grandfather followed her lead when applied for his social security card in 1936.  My father, Rodney Wead, never learned why the spelling change in our surname. The Census Bureau and other government sources frequently contain errors in ages, relationships to the heads of households, racial classification, employment, literacy, name spellings, real estate and other categories involving the documentation of African American families. This e-book will offer recommendations on how to confirm the demographic data and thereby move around the “brick wall” effects. “The wall” or “the brick wall” is a phrase often used in genealogy to describe what it feels like when after several hours or even years of sorting through delicate historical information, the researcher is not able to breakthrough with accurate information about their ancestor.

You do not have to get used to the wall’s reality. Approach your research by thinking new thoughts and seek opportunities in the historical challenges to keep walls in our ways.  Combine the “old school” with new ways. See value in the centuries ago inscribed family Bibles while trusting the technology to locate grave markers and passports of your ancestors. Invest your time and resources into learning more about your ancestors for personal, professional, mental and physical health benefits. It will be worth it.

Mental, Psychological, Spiritual Walls

“Why can’t I know my birthday?” asked Frederick Douglass, born a slave around 1817.  Think about that statement by the great statesman, Douglass. It was rare for slaves and any indentured black servants to know the details of their lives. Think about how difficult it may be for you to learn the same about your ancestors.

There are many more terms or single words that are triggers for deep-seeded and some surface matters that my cousin and I had not fully resolved. The same may be true for others who embark on the black genealogy path.  For some of the topics and situations we encountered during our research, Mark and I had to take a break after discovering something that was a breakthrough while also being a burden to our souls. We exhaled whenever those temporary “moments” of anxiety and questions flooded our thoughts and words such as the time we dealt with the meaning of word “property” to slave holders and traders. For instance, the reality that slaves were considered “property” by their owners meant that being bought and sold in exchange for land, cash, or another material matter, remains disheartening. It meant that slave families were ripped apart and the scars and outward behaviors would likely be passed through the generations.

Each time, we hit those bumps in the road, Mark and I successfully emerged from our unplanned research breaks with fresh outlooks and words of encouragement about our brave and smart ancestors. After all, if our ancestors had not endured the pain, suffering and the glorious moments, none of us would be on this earth. We are sharing our tribulations to help others who are deeply connected to their pasts to advance their present and future journeys.

 During your early discoveries of family ancestry, it is likely that you will find words, phrases, photographs and other documents that may trigger emotions and reactions that you may have long ago forgiven. For Mark and me, our triggers included the following words, phrases and digits:

During your early discoveries of family ancestry, it is likely that you will find words, phrases, photographs and other documents that may trigger emotions and reactions that you may have long ago forgiven. For Mark and me, our triggers included the following words, phrases and digits:

1525                                                                Land deeds                                         Slave owners

1619                                                                Lynching                                             Slave schedules

1919                                                                Middle Passage                                   Slavery                       

Branding                                                         Missing names of slaves                     Status of black women           

‘Death over foreign servitude’                        Mutilation                                           Whippings      

Fugitive                                                           Property                                 

“Gator Babies”                                                Probated wills                                    

Imprisonment                                                  “Slave for life”                                   

Illustration of slaves in chains, from the August 1838 edition of the American Antislavery Alamanac.

Illustration of slaves in chains. From Southern, N., American Antislavery Almanac (August 1838). Boston: Isaac Knapp, Publisher. https://archive.org/details/americanantislav1838chil/page/20/mode/2up

Slaves under the overseer's whip, illustration from the American Antislavery Almananc, 1838.

Illustration of slaves under the overseer’s whip. From Southern, N., American Antislavery Almanac (August 1838). Boston: Isaac Knapp, Publisher. https://archive.org/details/americanantislav1838chil/page/20/mode/2up

With many more expressions and reminders of our ‘gloomy past,’ Mark and I continued our path as overcomers. We focus on the ‘the white gleam of our bright star is cast,’ as penned by James Weldon Johnson in the poem, “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” It was written during a time when Jim Crow replaced slavery. His brother, John Rosamond Johnson, composed the song that is sung today and affectionately known as the “National Negro Anthem.”  The words to this anthem are a go-to song of comfort, faith and hope for the future. ­

Lift Every Voice and Sing

James Weldon Johnson – 1871-1938

Lift every voice and sing,
Till earth and heaven ring,
Ring with the harmonies of Liberty;
Let our rejoicing rise
High as the list’ning skies,
Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.
Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us,
Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us;
Facing the rising sun of our new day begun,
Let us march on till victory is won.

Stony the road we trod,
Bitter the chast’ning rod,
Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;
Yet with a steady beat,
Have not our weary feet
Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?
We have come over a way that with tears has been watered.
We have come, treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered,
Out from the gloomy past,
Till now we stand at last
Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast.

God of our weary years,
God of our silent tears,
Thou who hast brought us thus far on the way;
Thou who hast by Thy might,
Led us into the light,
Keep us forever in the path, we pray.
Lest our feet stray from the places, our God, where we met Thee,
Lest our hearts, drunk with the wine of the world, we forget Thee;
Shadowed beneath Thy hand,
May we forever stand,
True to our God,
True to our native land.

From Saint Peter Relates an Incident by James Weldon Johnson. Copyright © 1917, 1921, 1935 James Weldon Johnson, renewed 1963 by Grace Nail Johnson.

Let’s get started.

Out of Sight: An Introduction to Unearthing Your African American and Afro Caribbean Genealogy

By  Dr. Ann Lineve Wead With Mark S. Owen MS

Awaiting Final Editing and Proof from Publisher.

© Copy right (2021) by Dr. Ann Lineve Wead and Mark S. Owen, MS, Good Genes Genealogy Services – All rights reserved.

It is not legal to reproduce, duplicate, or transmit any part of this document in either electronic means or printed format. Recording of this publication is strictly prohibited.

This book is dedicated to our collective family. The winding, twisting, inspiring, troubling, confusing, and often rewarding stories from our family have inspired us –
 first cousins, maternal side – and we now present our first joint work.

The book is primarily written by Ann with help from Cousin Mark.

Thank you, ancestors and living family for giving us life.

Mark (in memory of Mom Lyla Owen) Owen

and

Ann Lineve (in honor of Lyla’s oldest sister and my Mom, Angeline Owen) Wead

January 20, 2021


Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

Part I: Out of Our Gloomy Past       

Slavery’s Impact Upon Black Genealogical Research ……………………………………………………………………. 6

Pre- and Post-Civil War Searches ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8

Making the most of “Brick Walls” ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 9

Mental, Psychological, Spiritual Walls ………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

Find a Way or Make One ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

Treasure Hunts ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16

“Use What You Got” ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 18

1930 United States Federal Census …………………………………………………………………………………………… 34

Questions to get you started with family history interviews …………………………………………………………… 44

Childhood …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 44

Marriage ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 44

Parents and Family …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 45

Holidays and Celebrations ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 45

Major and Historical Events …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 45

Part II: The Workbook – The Game Changers in Black Genealogy

Sharing Your Story ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 46

Top Black Genealogy Sources …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 48

Other resources­­ ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 50

Hidden Figures in Your Family – House Hunting ………………………………………………………………………… 58

Introduction

Thank you for investing in your future by learning tried-and-true techniques that will help to unlock your family’s rich history.

The goal of this e-book is to help you efficiently navigate through the challenging and lengthy genealogy searches for African American ancestors.  Patience is a virtue for researchers on this journey. The intriguing stories about our ancestors who overcame huge obstacles to allow us to thrive will surely inspire you as a researcher. 

It is a good time to be a researcher of African American genealogy. When I restarted my interest in family genealogy, it was 2007 and the African American genealogical records were limited. Nearly 15 years later, an abundance of materials is available through government websites, Internet links and private sources that include professional genealogy researchers. 

African American genealogy discoveries typically include Native American, European and sometimes, West Indian or Afro-American. My cousin and genealogy collaborator, Mark Owen, recognized that our family composition fits the typical African American bloodline. Our family also share a common tortured history as that of our African American and to a lesser extent, Afro-Caribbean brethren and that is explained in one word: Slavery.

Laying down the tracks for the Liggins Legacy!

https://www.instagram.com/tv/CMdc94rHSuU/?igshid=1my9jvqrxqky7

Alfred Liggins, CEO, TV/RadioONE,https://www.thehistorymakers.org/biography/alfred-liggins-iii announced a significant project to benefit Richmond, Virginia and beyond.

The celebration of our ancestor’s history begins right now with visionary folk. I can see and feel the future in African American economic, ecological, social, educational, health and wellness, et al.

Congrats to the principal visionary of this empire, Cathy Hughes!

She remains our Omaha, Nebraska native powerhouse!

Watch 90+-year old Xi Xi Zeta Charter Member Share History on YouTube

March 16, 2021 marked our grad chapter’s 32nd anniversary. This retro video was recorded in 2019, Lithonia, Georgia.

My Legacy Soror Mom are among XiXiZeta’s founding. Listen, learn and love!


Here’s our history as scribed by Mom, Angie Wead and my Sister-Mom, Mary Martin-Blackmon.

FOUNDING FACTS:

ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY, INC

XI XI ZETA CHAPTER, LITHONIA, GEORGIA

MARCH 16, 1989

Soror Dove  Dr. Genova H. Lawrence saw a need to form a Zeta Phi Beta chapter in the Lithonia, Georgia area, when several women approached her with an interest in  becoming Zetas.  She had also met other graduate Sorors, who wanted to reclaim.  Shen then called a meeting at her home to organize a chapter, after she met for several months with prospective Sorors and graduate Sorors.  Note:  Soror Lawrence attended all Boule’s and met the five founders and three Sigmas (who assisted in the founding of the Sorority).

The Xi Xi Zeta Chapter was organized in 1988 and chartered on March 16, 1989 in Lithonia, Georgia by the Georgia State Director, Soror Bettye H. Shelling (Triumphant).  Chartering Sorors:  Dr Genova Lawrence, Veronica Lawrence-Bacote, Eula Hardiman, Ethel Chapman, Yvonne Mazyck.  Sorors immediately joining the chapter:  Sorors Josephine Cloud (Triumphant), Patricia Felder, Shirley Jefferson, Arlene Hawkins, Ann Kimbrough, and Angeline Wead.

The chapter reached out to the community and started the following programs:

            The African American Cultural History Club at Bruce Street Housing .  Three Sorors – Sorors Lawrence, Felder and Cloud knocked or rang forty doorbells to talk with occupants about the program, including:

  • An Archonian Club.
  • A tutorial program.
  • Chartered the Delta Xi Undergraduate chapter at DeVry of Technology on October 14, 1989.  sig Ann Kimbrough was the Dean of Pledges.  This chapter was later to the Kappa Psi Zeta sorority chapter.
  • Sponsored a Blue Revue Pageant in 1990.  5 scholarships and 15 awards were presented.

Page 2 – Xi Xi Zeta 30th Anniversary

  • A Saddler Club was organized with our youth group on Soror Lawrence’s Nova Glen farm.
  • Provided Thanksgiving Dinner, for several years, to the residents of Bethel A.M.E. Church Towers, assisted by Sigma Brothers – Rev. Joel Miles, Sr.(triumphant), Dr. Rufus Lawrence (triumphant, Brother Bruce Blackmon, and other volunteers.
  • Chapter Sorors have attended and/or contributed to all Georgia State Conferences, Regional Conferences, Boule’s and ZHope projects.
  • Participation/support in the annual Stork’s Nest Blitz, in March for Babies/March of Dimes, Relay for Life, community walks, and other community activities.
  • Representatives-Annual Founder’s Day Sigma/Zeta Brunch Committee

Chapter Basilei (1989 – Present):  Sorors Dr. Genova Lawrence, Dr. Angela Johnson, Angela Garrett (Triumphant), Deborah McClanahan, and Faye Rashid.

The chapter celebrated its 30th Anniversary with a Sisterhood Tea on March 16, 2019 at Soror/Dove Genova Lawrence’s home.  The event is presented on you tube, https://youtu.be/EqdH_xeq_lA

SCHOLARSHIP/SERVICE/SISTERHOOD/FINERWOMANHOOD

Submitted for all record-keeping by Sorors Angeline C. Wead and Mary Martin-Blackmon

Mom (Angie Wead) and me during the 2019 activities and photos.
Soror Mary Martin-Blackmon during a pre-COVID-19 activity with our chapter at her church in Lithonia, GA

How preserving his family’s history led to Atlanta’s foremost architect and me writing his story …

Genealogy is a complicated, rewarding journey. Fortunately, my friend, the award-winning Atlanta Architect Oscar Harris, superbly retained the information about his parents who were black pioneer pharmacists and operated a historical shop in a famous black neighborhood in Pittsburgh, PA.

What may family genealogists learn from Oscar?

  • Preserve, don’t just save, your family’s current records.
  • Ask lots of questions of your elders and be observant.
  • Remember your friends, neighbors and relatives’ stories.
  • Plan to report or author your family’s story, especially through an autobiography.

Here’s another site where Oscar’s story is published. Since the book, Oscar!< was published in 2013, Oscar’s “retirement” career has been undone as he is often sought after for lectures, architecture leadership, media articles, teaching and other fun projects.

Working with Oscar to record his story, pour through thousands of documents, learn so much about a once shy young man’s overcoming nature, his wife gave me a great “warning” and words of advice: “Oscar loves the process,” Sylvia Harris informed me.

For that, I am thankful.

Below is an article written by my dear friend, Sidmel Estes, who transitioned a few years ago. She too was a friend of Oscar in addition to being a visionary and solid TV executive producer who created “Good Day Atlanta” on Fox5 and was the first female president of the National Association of Black Journalists.


Here’s another site where Oscar’s story is published. Since the book, Oscar!< was published in 2013, Oscar’s “retirement” career has been undone as he is often sought after for lectures, architecture leadership, media articles, teaching and other fun projects.

Oscar! A review and arts

By (the late) Sidmel Esteshttps

https://patch.com/georgia/cascade/oscar-harris-breaks-through-barriers

Few people can say they helped shape the look of a city. But Oscar L. Harris, Jr, founder and president of Turner Associates can make that claim. From Centennial Olympic Park to Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, you can see the imprint of Oscar Harris. The new book, “Oscar! The Memoir of a Master Architect” takes you behind the scenes of crucial negotiations that opened the door for many minority architects and firms. It is no-olds barred account of what it took to break into one of the most exclusive professional circles…architecture. Many of the stories are not pretty and hard to take, but reflect the passion, aspirations and determination of a true artist who turned his creative energies into tangible works of beauty and substance.https://patch.com/georgia/cascade/oscar-harris-breaks-through-barriers

Oscar started his business at a time when African Americans were denied and insulted. With frankness and a proven track record, Turner Associates went from nothing to perhaps the most successful and diverse portfolio architectural firms in America. Oscar lays it all on the table as he gives insight into what it took to revitalize Underground Atlanta, re-build major government buildings and justice centers, retail centers, create “the look” of the 1996 Olympic Games and so much more.

Oscar offers a blueprint of what he envisions for the future to be able to turn  around in his profession in particular, but our society at large. The book also includes spectacular sketches, drawings and photographs of some of Oscar’s biggest accomplishments.

Sidmel Estes, owner of Break Through Media Consulting

Separately, here’s another link: https://butteratl.com/how-black-architect-oscar-harris-built-modern-atlanta/